New Scott Thomas Diary Entry Surfaces

“Dagnabbit!” barked Private Cletus Huckleberry. “Could you gimme a hand Bow-champ what with you being so strong and manly?”

What’s the problem?” I asked Cletus.

Cletus raised his rifle, and I saw what was stuck to it.

“Could you help pull this dang blasted dead baby off my dang bayonet,” said Cletus.

“I will not participate in a cover up of your war crime,” I declared, my deep, rich baritone echoing above the screams of the people my unit were torturing for the crime of looking at us funny.

“That’s your answer to everything,” said Cletus. “You said the same thing when I asked you to pass me the salt in the mess hall. You ain’t right in the head.”

Maybe I’m just a little too ‘right in the head’ for this madhouse born from the blood-drenched wet-dreams of the neocon-zionist conspiracy.

(continue reading at The MoxArgon Group.).

Muslihoon turned me on to this whacked out Sci-Fi blog.

It’s kinda, welllll….different.

More Anti-War Fasting From The Religious Left

Via Frontpage Magazine: Left wing Protestants and Catholics are joining Muslims on Columbus Day, Oct. 8, which also happens to coincide with Islam’s “Night of Power” during Ramadan, in the “interfaith fast to end the war in Iraq”.

I wonder….would they also fast to end a war the U.S. isn’t involved in?

The fasters include officials from the Islamic Society of North America, the National Council of Churches, the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR), the Catholic Maryknollers, Sojourners, the United Methodist Board of Church and Society, and the Quaker Fellowship of Reconciliation.What better way to draw religionists together than to transforming the sinister day of conquest formerly known as Columbus Day into a Ramadan fast devoted to opposing American imperialism?!

The interfaith fasters are calling on “all armed forces and militias to ‘fast’ from killing at least for one day, reminding them that Ramadan calls for a fast from violence as well.” They also want to exploit the fast so as to “educate people in our religious communities about electing a president and representatives who are committed to ending this war.”

It’s nice that al Qaeda and other insurgents in Iraq are also invited to join the interfaith fast. Maybe there will be a spontaneous Ramadan soccer game among all the contending parties in Iraq, as during the famously unofficial Christmas Truce between British and German troops in World War I.

Well, as The Church lady used to say, “Isn’t that special?!”

My Favorite Quotes…

from the NRO Symposium on the NYT Op-Ed about Iraq:

Frank J. Gaffney Jr:

Those who persist in denying that General David Petraeus’s counterinsurgency strategy is having the desired, salutary effect and who insist that our defeat is inevitable are promoting a self-fulfilling prophesy. They are so determined to score domestic political points by unilaterally ending the conflict in Iraq that they are prepared to surrender the country to al Qaeda and various Shiite militias and their respective Saudi, Iranian and Syrian enablers.

Makes me so mad I could spit!

Victor Davis Hanson:

The irony is that should President Bush endure the hysteria and furor and prove able to give the gifted Gen. Petraeus the necessary time — and I think he will — his presidency could still turn out to be Trumanesque, once we digest the changes in Europe, the progress on North Korea, the end of both the Taliban and Saddam, and the prevention of another 9/11 attack. How odd that all the insider advice to triangulate — big spending, new programs, uninspired appointments, liberal immigration reform — have nearly wrecked the administration, and what were once considered its liabilities — foreign policy, the war on terror and Iraq — may still save it.

Republican presidents should never slouch leftward. But they often do, don’t they?…to their own detriment, and to the detriment of the entire country.

Clifford D. May:

But most Americans have heard only the drumbeat of the antiwar Left. The Left has been banging out the message that the Petraeus mission has failed — since before the Petraeus mission was fully underway. And most of the mainstream media have been unwilling even to suggest an alternative narrative. (A notable exception is the Times’ own John Burns, a reporter who is apparently not read by Times editorial writers.)

So the O’Hanlon/Pollack op-ed is important. It forces the conversation to re-open.

Let’s see if CNN, and MSNBC starts sounding more optimistic in their coverage.

John McCain:

We must prevail. General Petraeus and his troops have asked Congress for just two things: the time and support they need to carry out their mission. They must have both, however much the congressional Democrats seek to withhold them. That is why I will keep fighting to ensure that our commanders have what they need to win this war.

Did you hear that? McCain just said, the Democrats do not want to support the troops!

Mackubin Thomas Owens:

Time is running out, not in Iraq but in Washington, D.C., where, as more than one commentator has pointed out, the Democratic majority in Congress and the party’s presidential candidates all seem to have opted for defeat and disgrace. Thanks to these geniuses and the Republicans who enable them, we may be on the verge of snatching defeat from the jaws of victory.

Ouch, baby.

James S. Robbins:

The weak link in the war effort is in the U.S. Congress. Politically driven assessments that downplay the progress of the war, pandering to antiwar groups, and a public that has tuned out, add up to grave difficulties in sustaining the war effort. Given more time, the progress in Iraq will become so clear as to be undeniable, and the troop drawdown could commence on more favorable terms.

Emphasis mine.

Peter W. Rodman:

Journalists not driven by anti-Bush animus may now want to herd in the more positive direction.

We can always hope.

Joseph Morrison Skelly: (what’s with all these 3-part names? Sheesh).

 The critics of this war will never alter their tune, since they have so much invested in failure. But the rhetoric of the skeptics may change gradually. Like the national mood, it will be influenced by events on the ground. Should progress continue, people will wish to be associated with it. We will thus witness the truth inherent in the well known adage, “Victory has a hundred fathers, but defeat is an orphan.”

There are a lot of orphans out there in the Democratic party.

Michael Yon: 

Skipping past the blow-by-blow and getting to the bottom line: I sense there has been a fundamental shift in Iraq. One officer called it a “change in the seas,” and I believe his words were accurate. Something has changed. The change is fundamental, and for once seems positive. And so, back to the O’Hanlon-Pollack story in the New York Times, “A War We Just Might Win,” I agree.

I suspect many Democrats will agree to disagree.

I’m hoping that this more optimistic view from former war critics is the first of many more to come. But I won’t hold my breath.

NYT Editorial: A War We Just Might win

Via Ace: Michael E. O’Hanlon and Kenneth M. Pollack from the Brookings Institution have written a piece for the NYT, in which they admit that a U.S. victory is possible in Iraq.

I have to tell you, the very idea that this is a surprise to some people, grates on my nerves. Yes, of course, we just might win. And if we weren’t constrained by the sort of PC rules of engagement, favored by Democrats, if we weren’t constantly battling a propaganda war here on the home front against liberal peace activists,  if we weren’t constantly dealing with leaks from the CIA, undermining our war effort, if we didn’t have to endure the constant drumbeat of negativity and defeatism from the Democrats, we might just be further along by now in our course toward victory.

In spite of all that, the Troop Surge is now having the positive results hoped for, and even The New York Times can’t deny it. They can see the writing on the wall.

U.S. Sinks N. Korean Ship Bound For Iran?

Gateway Pundit is reporting the possible downing of a North Korean ship bound for Iran with cargoes of enriched uranium and nuclear equipment. The only source for this so far is The Debka File.
It was reported earlier this month that while the North Korean 2006 test demonstrated the viability and reliability of North Korea’s Scud- and Nodong-class systems, it left open the status of the three ballistic missile systems that the Korean People’s Army (KPA) recently placed, or is placing, into service as testing on North Korea short-range missile systems has been quietly ongoing.

In reports first published by DEBKAfile, American naval and air forces intercepted two North Korean vessels clandestinely en route for Iran with cargoes of enriched uranium and nuclear equipment in the past month. The shutdown of Pongyong’s nuclear facilities has made these items surplus to North Korea’s requirements and the Islamic Republic was more than willing to pay a hefty price for the goods.

On July 12, the second intercepted North Korean freighter was sunk in the Arabian Sea.

This ain’t by any means, a sure thing without further corroboration in the media.

 UPDATE:

How about the  ACG-CIS?  Here’s what they are reporting:

It was not immediately clear why, around July 10, 2007, the Syrian nationals, primarily engaged in construction, trades and agricultural occupations, should have vacated Lebanon without notice.  The nationals were noticed to have returned to Beirut and the Jordan Valley by July 21, 2007.

ACG-CIS is of the opinion that the approximate 10-day absence may have been in part due to a warning system alerting the nationals to the possibility of an impending military or terror strike against Israel and other western interests in the region.

According a number of news sources, officials and clerics from Syria and Iran met during this time period reportedly to draw plans and scenarios for proposed attacks and increased activity against western interests in both the Mid East region and elsewhere. Those talks ended last week with no official announcements from any of the participants.

ACG-CIS, based upon further analysis, believe that the nationals were warned of an apparent military style strike or strikes as Hezbollah was reported to be moving missiles in civilian populated areas throughout southern Lebanon. This movement along with the involvement of the Iranian president, an adamant believer in nuclear technology and development, lead to concerns about the possibility of a military style “dirty bomb” nuclear attack or a ballistic missile attack involving nuclear weapons purchased from North Korea.

In reports first published by DEBKAfile, American naval and air forces intercepted two North Korean vessels clandestinely en route for Iran with cargoes of enriched uranium and nuclear equipment in the past month. The shutdown of Pongyong’s nuclear facilities has made these items surplus to North Korea’s requirements and the Islamic Republic was more than willing to pay a hefty price for the goods.

On July 12, the second intercepted North Korean freighter was sunk in the Arabian Sea by torpedoes fired from a US submarine 100 miles southeast of the Iranian naval base-port of Chah Bahar. Delivery of its freight of enriched weapons-grade uranium and equipment and engines for manufacturing more fissile material including plutonium in its hold could have jump-forwarded Iran’s nuclear bomb and warhead project, lopping off at least a year of work. For this Iran’s rulers were ready to reportedly pay out a cool $500 million.

A few hours earlier, President Bush received an intelligence briefing on the vessel, its freight and destination. Apparently the shipment was brought forward by several weeks to evade detection by UN nuclear inspectors scheduled to visit Pyongyang this week to verify the dismantling of its nuclear facilities.

US airplanes had been tracking the freighter and picked up signs of radioactivity, indicating the presence of nuclear materials aboard.

President Bush had the option of ordering US Marines to board the vessel or to sink it. He decided on the latter – both because the North Korean freighter was approaching an area patrolled by Iranian naval units and seizure of the vessel by American marines might have provoked a clash; secondly, it was the better choice in order to avoid exposing US troops to radioactive contamination. American naval and air units in the Persian Gulf, Middle East and seas opposite North Korea were ordered to go on a high state of readiness and the torpedo the North Korean vessel was accomplished without delay.

Verrrrry interesting.