Saying Farewell To Some American Heros

Here’s a tribute to our military fallen for the week ending June 13, 2009:

There was no all star guest list for Staff Sgt. Beale’s funeral, but my friend Reeko of the GI Woodshop passed this information along:

Nowadays, one can be led to believe that Americans, (outside of the military) no longer respect honor, or honor sacrifice.Let it be it known that there are many places in this land where people still recognize the courage and impact of total self-sacrifice. Killed in action the week before, the body of Staff Sergeant John C. Beale was returned to Falcon Field in Peachtree City, Georgia, just south of Atlanta, on June 11, 2009. The Henry County Police Department escorted the procession to the funeral home in McDonough, Georgia.

A simple notice in local papers indicated the road route to be taken and the approximate time.

The link above below is a short travelogue of that day’s remarkable and painful journey.

Watch this if you wish to have some of your faith in the American people restored.

UPDATE:

It seems the Army has promoted John Beale to Sergeant First Class (E7) according to the DoD press release:

http://www.defenselink.mil/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=12728

Michelle Malkin paid tribute, yesterday,  to another soldier, who was killed in Afghanistan over the weekend.

3 thoughts on “Saying Farewell To Some American Heros

  1. just fyi: the Army had promoted John Beale to Sergeant First Class (E7) according to the DoD press release:

    http://www.defenselink.mil/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=12728

    the tribute video made by Georgia State Representative Steve Davis apparently still had John’s rank when he deployed, and the accompanying pictures posted online also showed John wearing the rank of Staff Sergeant (E6).

    at ANY rank, a fitting tribute to an American hero.

    “…Where did we find such men? They are typical of this land as the Founding Fathers were typical. We found them in our streets, in the offices, the shops and the working places of our country and on the farms.

    We cannot escape our destiny, nor should we try to do so. The leadership of the free world was thrust upon us two centuries ago in that little hall of Philadelphia. In the days following World War II, when the economic strength and power of America was all that stood between the world and the return to the dark ages, Pope Pius XII said, “The American people have a great genius for splendid and unselfish actions. Into the hands of America God has placed the destinies of an afflicted mankind.”

    We are indeed, and we are today, the last best hope of man on earth.” California Gov Ronald W. Reagan, 1974

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  2. I was honor guard at one funeral while in Cali.

    I signed on, cuz I had blues, and a sword, and I could look as pretty as I could for the guy we were burying.

    background, I’ve stood at the position of attentin for 8 hours, with only a break every hour so I could drink water, and on break at 4 hours so I could stretch my legs only to come back at stand at the position of attention again.

    It was unpleasent, but I did it, cuz damnit I was Marine.

    I didn’t break bearing or position in that time, I might have wiggled my knee’s or shrugged my shoulders a little bit, but a civvy wouldn’t have noticed most likely.

    But when I was on that honor guard I broke bearing so many times. I stood straight, I did the moves properly, but I had tears running down my face the entire time.

    I was Marine, and I believe I earned my spot, but compared to the man that I helped bury, I was less than an ant, and thinking of all the other men who came before me, I doubted I deserved to wear the same uniform as them.

    They were GREAT! men and as it worked out, I was just marking time.

    Like

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